21 May, 2011

Alive

When I posted about my mother, I got many comments and e-mails about what a class act she is.  I certainly am biased, but I couldn't agree more.

One of the things that I respect so much about my mother is that during the eight years my father was away from us as children, she thought it was of paramount importance that she "kept him alive" in our minds.  We only saw our father a couple times a year, and we only spoke to him on the phone every Sunday night. My mother thought that wasn't enough time for us to really know him.  She was adamant that his family was not going to forget about him just because he was in prison.

I remember that my mother always sent him copies of our report cards and had us write notes about our favorite subjects and what we were learning that grading period.  He was always so proud that his girls were straight A students.

At Christmastime, when my mother got our pictures taken with Santa, she had us write something to Daddy on the pictures.  In wobbly, five year-old penmanship, I wrote on one of them, "Daddy we love you from your two little girls".

Mama always wanted us to know what Daddy was like as a person.  She told us stories about him over and over again.  Every time she told us the same story, it felt like it was the first time I ever heard it.  My favorite story was that Daddy bought most of his impoverished senior class their class rings.  I loved his benevolence.  Even the FBI has commented on my father's generosity.

Whenever a movie came on television that my father liked, my mother got us all excited for one of Daddy's movies.   I can't tell you how many times I watched "King Kong."  Daddy loved it, so I sat through it with a smile on my face.  My father loved the brute strength of the giant gorilla, so I loved it too.

Daddy's favorite song was Jim Croce's "Bad, Bad, Leroy Brown."  My father loved it that Leroy was so tough, but it the end, he wasn't as tough as he thought he was.  Every time that song came on the radio, my mother announced that it was "Daddy's song", and I hung on every word of it.  It is still my favorite song, and whenever I hear it, I can't wipe the smile off my face.

My mother is stricken with Alzheimer's Disease now, and barely remembers my father.  My family and I tell her stories about him all the time to try to keep him alive in her memory.  Daddy is so important in our lives that all of us refuse to let him die in each other's mind.


21 comments:

  1. I LOVE IT MISSY! SAD BUT BEAUTIFUL..MY MOTHER LOVED YOUR FATHER VERY MUCH.. HE WAS A VERY KIND MAN, THAT TRULY LOVED HIS FAMILY...BE BLESSED, JUST BECUZ...

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  2. Do you remember a gold plated, mint condition, silver dollar?

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  3. How old was your father when he committed the laguna niguel heist of the United Bank of California?

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    1. The burglary was right before his 36th birthday.

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    2. And they got caught right after, morons left fingerprints on a glass in the dishwasher of the condo they were staying in. Again, the bragging of the crime is perplexing and actually troubling. Sad, so sad for you.

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  4. You have a fascinating blog here. Thanks for stopping by mine. I will be back for sure!

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  5. My Husband is cousin's with your Dad, he is Jerry Alunni and his Dad was Emil and we live outside of Cleveland his Mother Mary who is 90 remembers your Mom and your Grandmother Bertha used to visit them all the time your Grandmother loved my Mother-In - law and was sad to hear about your Mother's illness and always like your Dad and Uncle.
    Take Care,
    Madelon Alunni

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    1. Dear Madelon,

      It is so nice to hear from you! I don't know how I missed this comment, but I am so happy i finally saw it.

      My father always loved the Alunni family. I remember that Aunt Jenny (whom we always called Aunt Sitzi (sp. ?) was an Alunni. She was my grandfather's (Emilio's) sister. How does she fit into your husband's family tree?

      Please email me at mdinsio@yahoo.com. I would love to get to know that side of my family!

      Melissa

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    2. Is that something to be proud of?

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  6. Of course she is going to remove anything negative about her father, especially the part of him being the triggerman in the Joey Naples murder. It's in an FBI affidavit and was clearly stated by Lenny Strollo. Are all you people nuts? Amil Dinsio was a criminal who couldn't make an honest living like most people in life have to do. Quit glamorizing his bank robbery in Laguna Nigel...they all got caught, so how smooth of a robbery was it? Sad that people are actually sympathizing with a dishonest, lying, thieving low life! You all need your heads examined!

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  7. It's even sadder when Amil's daughter actually starts a blog glamorizing her father's crimes! Move on Melissa, it was 40 years ago and your father is rotting in prison. Typical Youngstown people...and the Dinsio's aren't even from Youngstown, they lived in West Branch which is the sticks! So sad how some people try to make money. I bet the whole family has dug up the basement or backyard.

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  8. yea, i found another blog that she commented on about her family's involvement with Strollo and the mob. She then goes on to passively threaten one of the commenters to have the courage to say they're name and not be anonymous.

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  9. and what's even creepier is that she's a licensed nursing home administrator.

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  10. Regarding the Joey Naples murder, I have no idea about any affidavit. However, I DO NOT CARE if my father murdered Joey Naples. The Dinsios love and support each other, regardless of the circumstances. THAT is what it means to be a family. I'm so sad for you that you don't know the true meaning of family.

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    1. I know the true meaning of family and that's why I think it is repulsive to be sharing your father's life online. Why not put it to bed? Your dad and his crew were caught in the Laguna Nigel heist, it's not like they got away with it. I'm sure you're a very nice person, but it's perplexing why you want to share prison photos and glamorize a convict. My great uncle was Jimmy Prato, and nobody in my family would advertise his life (because he was a career criminal). Shameful.

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    2. What a shame that your great uncle was not blessed with a better family that loved him unconditionally.

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  11. By the way, I find it interesting...and a little creepy...that you've searched for information about me. Hmmmm...

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    1. I'm a LNHA as well in Massachusetts...I got far enough away from Youngstown...Don't put your dad's life on display Melissa, it's truly ashame.

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    2. The creepiness I referenced was your search for other blog comments of mine.

      I, like most people, usually am not concerned about those who comment anonymously (ooooh, another passive threat); however, your (both of you who hide behind anonymity) comments about Lenny Strollo's affidavit deserve brief attention.

      Lenny Strollo testified under oath in two trials in two different courts of law in the late 1990's that he did not know the identity of Joey Naples' killer. Accordingly, your story of Lenny Strollo's sworn affidavit must be untrue...unless, of course, you are suggesting that the FBI engaged in the subornation of perjury at trial.

      Finally, if you don't like my blog, don't read it. It's really that simple.

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